Still Beautiful: St. Augustine, FL Celebrates 450 Years!

I had the pleasure of stumbling into St. Augustine, Florida just prior to its 450th Anniversary last week, while I was in the process of college tours with my daughter.  The town is the oldest permanently occupied European settlement in the U.S.  I am a graduate of Flagler College, situated in St. Augustine, and was happy to see my daughter include it on her list of potential schools.

The town was putting last minute touches on preparations for its scheduled weekend celebrations, which includes a visit from King Felipe and Queen Letizia of Spain and a series free concerts including Aaron Neville, Emmylou Harris, and Rodney Crowell.

I had time to get a few photos of this beautiful town and unique college setting while we were there.

Nighttime photo of Lions Bridge and Anastasia Island in St. Augustine, FL.
Castillo de San Marcos
Nighttime photo of Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, FL.
Lions Bridge/Matanzas River
Dawn at Lions Bridge and Matanzas River in St. Augustine, FL.
Castillo de San Marcos
Castillo de San Marcos, St. Augustine, FL.
St. Augustine's Castillo de San Marcos
Castillo de San Marcos
Historic St. George Street
St. George Street, St. Augustine, FL.
St. Augustine Lighthouse
St. Augustine Lighthouse and Maritime Museum
Flagler College
Flagler College, formerly Ponce de Leon Hotel, courtyard built by Henry Flagler.
Flagler College fountain
Flagler College courtyard, sundial, fountain.
Flagler College
Flagler College
Flagler College
Flagler College gargoyle drains and tower.
Flagler College
Flagler College courtyard.

The town has only improved with the passage of time.  As a tourist locale, there’s no shortage of things to do and see.

Happy Labor Day weekend to everyone.

Historic St. Augustine, FL side street. ©Pawpro Media
Historic St. Augustine, FL side street.

Family History/Genealogy/ Videos An Emerging Niche Market

Genealogical research is a popular hobby all over the world and the Web has made the research easier, faster and more accessible.  It’s a rewarding process, but hobbyists and professionals can find themselves overwhelmed by the bulk of information gathered, and how best to condense it into a palpable and transferable package.  I’ve been involved in the research of my own family history for nearly 20 years.  I’ve traveled to distant locations to explore the places my ancestors lived, worked and died. On these trips I always take photographs and video, and through the years I’ve compiled a good deal of material.  Of course, the problem becomes, what do you do with this material once you have it?  And how do you share it with family members?

Many people are turning to video professionals such as myself to compile their research into long or short form videos.  The video may take on a documentary look, as if Ken Burns has finally set his sights on your family history with interviews of living family members recounting family lore; or, simply pictures set to music with graphics.  Most valuable are the words and memories of elderly relatives who can recount the early days of their lives.  If these stories aren’t recorded in some fashion, they may be lost with the passage of time.  I know this all too well.  Back in 2000 I scheduled a visit with my 92-year old grandfather in Wheeling, West Virginia to talk to him about his memories of his early life in Ohio and West Virginia.  Sadly, he fell and broke his hip several days before my visit and died a day after the surgery to repair the break.  The memories and stories were lost.

Video is a great way to share and preserve the information that you’ve spent years gathering for this generation and those to come.  If you would like to pursue a video project of this sort, please give me a call.  I would love to help you.  You don’t have to live in the DC area to use my services.  It makes a great gift, too!